THE MASTER IS COME
John xi. 28

Robert Hawker
(1753-1827)


" The master is come, and calleth for thee,"–John xi. 28.

My soul, mark how gracious the Lord is to his people in the special and distinguishing tokens of his grace. Jesus doth not barely send his gospel to the church, or house, or family; but he speaketh by the soft, but powerful whispers of his love, to the individual soul. "To thee is the word of his salvation sent." Hence the soul who feels the sovereignty of his word in the constraining influences with which it is accompanied, cries out, I shall never forget thy word, for by it thou hast quickened me. But besides the calls of his grace in his house of prayer, in how many Ways, and by what a variety of methods, is the Lord Jesus calling upon his people. My soul, I hope that thou art always upon the look out, and art getting to thy watch-tower to hear what the Lord thy God hath to say to thee, by his word, by his providences, his chastisements in love, and in all the gracious manifestations of his favour. Behold, he saith, "I stand at the door and knock." So Jesus calleth, and so let my soul hear. Now, Lord, thou art calling me by thy word and providence in a way of grace: by and by I shall hear thy voice in the hour of death and judgment. And who shall say how very powerful, sweet, and gracious, that call is, when Jesus cometh to take his people home to himself, that where he is, there they may be also? 'I hear my Master's voice,' said a highly favoured servant of God in the moment of his departure. Perhaps a loud voice, a glorious distinguishable voice, to him that is called, when no stander by is at all conscious of the sound. Hence another said, when he was dying, 'I shall change my place, but not my company.' Jesus, master, in that hour be it my happiness to say, "let me hear thy voice, let me see thy countenance: for sweet is thy voice, and thy countenance is comely."

From the POOR MAN'S MORNING AND EVENING PORTIONS.


Robert Hawker



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