AND SHE CALLED THE NAME
OF THE LORD THAT SPAKE UNTO HER"

Gen. 16:13-14

Robert Hawker
(1753-1827)


"And she called the name of the Lord that spake unto her, thou God seest me: for she said, have I also here looked after him that seeth me? Wherefore the well was called Beer-lahai-roi."--Gen. xvi. 13, 14.

Behold, my soul, what very blessed instructions arise out of this scripture. Beg of God the Holy Ghost to make thy present evening meditation of it sweet. The words themselves are the reflection of Hagar, the handmaid of Sarah, when she fled from her mistress into the wilderness. In a situation of great distress, the Lord manifested himself to her, and the conclusion she drew from it, was, as is expressed, "thou, Lord, seest me." This indeed, was the name she gave unto the Lord, as if henceforth she would know the Lord in all his mercies by this name. Sweet thought! Jesus is known by his name; and in his name his grace is revealed. But Hagar added another delightful reflection, "for she said, have I also here looked after him that seeth me?" As if she had said, 'And hath the grace God looking upon me, wrought grace in me?' But the words may be read differently, and some indeed read them so: 'Have I looked for the Lord, when the Lord looked after me? Alas! I thought not of him, until that he called me by his grace.' Here is another delightful thought of Hagar's, and in perfect harmony with the gospel of Jesus. For "if we love God, it is because he first loved us." And there is another reflection, as interesting as either: "wherefore the well was called Beer-lahai-roi;" that is, "the well of him that liveth and looketh on." This became Hagar's memorial; as if she would for ever perpetuate the name of him that looked on and regarded her sorrow. This well, this place, this sacred spot, shall be Hagar's Bethel; it shall tell every one that passeth by, here the Lord wrought, and here he manifested grace to a poor handmaid. Precious scripture of a precious God! Who but must feel delight in beholding Hagar's faith? And who but must find cause to bless God, both for giving that faith, and affording so favourable an occasion for the exercise of it? And shall I not, and will not you, reader, gather some of the many delightful instructions from it, for our own use, which it is so highly calculated to bring? Did the angel of the Lord look on Hagar; and doth he not look on every child of his? Am I at any time looking after Jesus, and is not Jesus looking after me? Oh! what a volume of encouragement ariseth from this one view, to persevere in looking after him, and in waiting for him; that before I thought of him, or was looking after him, Jesus was both caring and looking upon me! It is impossible to be beforehand with God. Put down then, my soul, this conclusion from this blessed scripture, that in every place, in every state, upon every occasion, thy Jesus liveth, and looketh on. And do thou call the Lord by the same name as Hagar did, that speaketh to thee, in every place, and by every providence, "Thou God seest me." And never, never forget, when thou art hardest put to it, and art seeking Jesus sorrowing; though, to thy blind eye, he doth not so immediately appear; that he is still seeing, and following thee, even when thou art not seeking and following after him. Let this be in thy constant remembrance; and make every spot that is memorable, like the well Beer-lahai-roi, to draw water of salvation from; for in every one it is the well of him that liveth and looketh on. Precious Lord Jesus! henceforth grant me grace, that while thou art looking after me with love and favour, I may be looking unto thee with faith and praise. And through every step of my wilderness state, while going home to my Father's house, let this be my comfort, and the burden of my song in this house of my pilgrimage, "Thou God seest me!"

From the POOR MAN'S MORNING AND EVENING PORTIONS.

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Robert Hawker



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