WHICH THINGS THE ANGELS DESIRE TO LOOK INTO

I Pet. 1:12

Robert Hawker
(1753-1827)



"Which things the angels desire to look into."–I Pet. i. 12.

My soul, what an argument ariseth out of this view, of the angels of light being inquisitive about man's redemption, to stir thee up to the same most blessed contemplation! If in the apprehension of those intelligent and exalted beings of light, the subject is so glorious, what ought it to be to thee? If, as the words represent, they fix their closest attention, and are lost in admiration, wonder, love, and praise; how is it that thou, who art so deeply interested in the blissful theme, shouldest forget it, as thou dost for hours together, and, even when thou thinkest of it, contemplate it so very coolly? Oh for grace more and more to study Jesus and his love, Jesus and his grace, Jesus and his great salvation! But among the wonders of redemption, is there not one point (and as it concerns thee, my soul, a marvellous one indeed it is) which may well be supposed to call forth the greater astonishment of the holy angels as they behold it; I mean, as they behold the glory of thy Jesus advanced, not only when poor sinners praise him for what he is in himself, and what he is to them, but when their emptiness, poverty, wants, and wretchedness, afford the rich opportunity for the Lord Jesus to get to himself glory in giving out of his fulness? Here, surely, angels may well desire to pry into the cause, and be lost in the contemplation. And, as it concerns thee, my soul, how must the angels, "that are ministering spirits, sent forth to minister unto them that are heirs of salvation;" how must they stand amazed, when they see thy Lord waiting to be gracious unto thee, even in the very time when thou wouldest tire every patience but his, "in wearying with thine iniquities?" And how must their angelic minds feel amazed that Jesus should get glory from such a poor worthless worm as thou art, in making the riches of his grace to shine upon thee, while thousands, not more undeserving, know him not, and are unacquainted with his grace and mercy! Oh! gracious Lord! how is it that thou thus dost manifest thyself to me otherwise than thou dost unto the world? Ye angels of light! ye ministering spirits of my God! join with me in praise for my Lord's graciousness to such a sinner; for, surely, your high intelligent minds cannot but be lost in admiration, when beholding the aboundings of grace exceeding even the aboundings of sin, and, in my instance, as far surpassing "as the heavens are higher than the earth."

From THE POOR MAN'S MORNING AND EVENING PORTIONS.